“Chorus,” By Leigh Wilbanks; Red Door Properties

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When exploring Stapleton with clients new to the area, I always gravitate toward the public art showcased throughout the neighborhood in various open and shared spaces. My favorite exhibit is “Chorus,” by sculptor Thomas Sayre.

The elements of this exhibit are scattered about in different spots between the bridges at East 26thAvenue and Martin Luther King Boulevard. There are 19 pieces in total, and they are arranged in different groupings varying in size from singles to quintets. They are earth cast “vessels” that have been created by the molds dug by an industrial tree spade. Their shapes, cracks and colors vary from piece to piece. To me, this exhibit reflects the diversity that makes Stapleton so unique. This community embraces and celebrates its diversity, and I think “Chorus” reflects that.

Stapleton’s Public Master Plan was adopted in 2005. The plan sets guidelines and inspiration for public art throughout Stapleton and ensures that special locations are celebrated and engaging for the public. There are some really amazing exhibits throughout the community. I recommend hopping on a bike and checking out the community’s public art tour found on Stapleton’s website. Not all communities make open space a priority during the design process. These public pieces make our open spaces sacred in so many ways. And, really, that’s what community is all about … and that’s what Stapleton is all about, too.

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